Did you know that recruiters and hiring managers can spot a generic cover letter from a mile away? It is important that each cover letter you write is specific to the company and the position you are applying more. This section will help you master the art of the cover letter and get your application noticed. Below you will find information on cover letter formats, cover letter content and guides & samples.

Depending on the position you are applying for, you may chose to write a traditional cover letter or a bulleted cover letter. Please see the format guides below to learn more:

Traditional Format Cover Letter

Bulleted Format Cover Letter

Additional tips for writing cover letters:

  • Use a paragraph or bullet format for your cover letter. Keep the letter concise and limit to one page (3-4 paragraphs).
  • Tailor letter for each position, company, etc.  Employers can spot a template right away.
  • Stay positive throughout the letter.
  • Write out contractions to make it more formal.
  • Take time to write well and proofread.
  • Stick with a traditional format cover letter for accounting and finance positions
  • Keep the letter concise and limit to one page (3-4 paragraphs maximum) which will ensure plenty of white space.
  • Use short paragraphs in block formation (no indentation).
  • Leave a space (one return) between paragraphs.
  • Include the complete company name and address even for online applications.
  • Tailor letter for each position, company, etc. Employers can spot a generic cover letter right away.
  • Stay positive and confident throughout the letter.
  • Address the letter to an individual whenever possible. Otherwise, call the employer to find out the contact person or use “Dear Company Name Hiring Manager” or “Dear Company Name Human Resources”.
  • Use active voice and professional language; write out contractions to make it more formal.
  • Take time to write well and proofread for spelling and grammatical errors.
  • Use the same font and stationery as your resumé.
  • Rewrite to avoid the overuse “I” when starting sentences; show yourself as a team player, not as self-obsessed.